Philosophical Muse : Travel Muse Part 2 – A Return To A New Familiarity

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And thus I return back to my home, having finished attending a training course.

It has been quite a journey, however short it may have been.
Every journey changes you, moulds you and transforms you to be the person that you will ultimately be to date.

It isn’t about going to distant foreign grounds (which in itself has its own charm of the thrill of the unknown) but rather, meeting with new people and seeing things that are different.

And once you return home, the journey has transformed you in such a way that home isn’t the same home that you left upon the embarkation of the journey.
It feels different, and somewhat foreign (not as foreign of course as the stranger land from which you’ve returned from but different).
And yet melded into this mix is the sense of familiarity and tinges of nostalgia as well.

Because home was where you planted yourself. The roots of connection stem from your soul into the very floor you walk upon under your roof. And over time your soul sprout leaves and branches of comfort.
But when you’ve gone to distance places and return, you bring back with you new seeds to be planted to add on to your little forest world, making it all the more vibrant.

There was a saying in one of the Hong Kong Ip Man films that mentioned something along the lines of “men should venture out to foreign lands during their lives”.

It’s kind of true. To open one’s mind and see the world from a different perspective.

Just like knowledge, your perception of the world around you is only as good as the amount of input you put into yourself. You read ABC books as a child, and as you grew older, you supplement that with different varieties of reading material. Every new knowledge paints a new colour to your world and occasionally, dot it with questions and curiosities that may further push you to explore for more answers.

I guess that’s how our forefathers progressed the human race. Exploration to the unknown, breaking pass the barriers that held them.

If it weren’t for new experiences, we might be living in a world today that we deem as flat instead of round. We might not realise that there are many other humans out there of different colour, race, creed, beliefs and practices.

But not only is it a teacher in the ways of mind expansion. But it is also a humbler of the soul and controller of the ego.
It becomes a humbling experience when you think you’ve been a master of your homelands, only to find out that out there are those with greater talents and skills than yourself.

The magic isn’t to be intimidated by these strangers but to learn from them. And share your knowledge and experiences with them as well. Make the world filled with variety.

I think humans were made to reunite after being separated. We scatter throughout the face of this earth to explore and later reunite and share and expand humanity’s knowledge base.

I used to live in a small shell of a world. But the more I was given a chance to explore out, the more I saw and realised and opened so many more doors. Dead-ends got broken down and new paths revealed. What seemed a hopeless turn turned out to be an avenue and path to more possibilites.

Exploration changes the world you perceive. Yes, it’s a cliche notion that has been said time and again probably not just on my blog alone, but in many other blogs as well mediums of information sharing.

But it is regardless always a good reminder to any readers passing by. That the world is indeed an oyster of experiences waiting to be discovered. And that the world we all know is just a tip of the iceberg.

And once you travel out, explore, and return you always feel the place you once knew has changed somewhat.

Oh, the world you once knew is not gone…just all the more colourful and vibrant.

As always I quote T.S Eliot :

” We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. “

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Philosophical Muse : Travel Muse Part 1 – Entering The Unknown, Wheel In Hand

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And so I’ve just spent the weekend in another country and have returned back to my homeland.

I entered via land, in my own vehicle this time, behind the wheel of my car. Normally for the many season travellers out there, they would deem my news as mere ramblings of a kid.

But somehow this trip was a little life changing. It was something personal, almost spiritual. It probably also had to do with the fact that my car to me is more than just a vehicle or a metallic box with wheels.

I love my car. It is an integral part of my life. I gave it a name, defended it against the criticisms from my dad, ocassionally kiss it good night and talk to it. I’ve spent much of my earnings maintaining it as best I could. Call me deranged perhaps, but it’s that feeling you get when you go to a petstore and choose a dog that you really love. You didn’t choose a mutt or an animal. You chose a best friend. Something you can pour your heart out to.

My car has served me well and even protected me from an accident where I went sideways at 90 km/h and slammed into the curb.

My car is something personal, a piece of me, an extension of my self. Like a limb that grows from me. It and I form a symbiotic relationship when we traverse the plane of roads and passing vehicles.

It was with this type of relationship, that driving into a foreign country aboard my own car gave me a new feeling.

It isn’t so much the thrill of adventure (which I did have quite a lot of), as it was entering the unknown with a best friend. I’ve entered this new land via plane and bus in the past.
But when you’re in a personalised moving space, a companion container, there grows a special bond towards the land upon which you and your car connects to. It gets into your system, this profound feeling of discovery and growing courage as one by one, the uncertainties that you had before entering start to dissipate as you familiarise yourself with the lay of the land.

And having a partner with you, one that you care so much, a companion who you are close with, having spent so much time together; that creates a beautiful atmosphere in the journey of exploration.

I think at the end of the day, wherever the journey of discovery to new lands may be, having a companion changes the feel. It gets personal, connected.

Perhaps my story is just the plain story of a man and his car, or more like the inner boy and his best friend.
But that could perhaps also explain why real drivers, and I repeat, real drivers or motorheads, develop this sort of love and relationship towards their machine.

It isn’t about the thrill of the drive, nor is it about the power under the hood. It’s more than that.
It’s the experience and feeling you get when sitting behind that wheel. It makes you feel different.

When you’re in a foreign land, in the unknown, traversing with a close mate that holds a special place in your heart, it reignites that spark of curiosity and wonder once again. That excitement. That little excited child within comes out, as though entering a theme park for the first time.

And you’re entering with your best friend by your side.